Exercise Rates Rising for Urban, Rural Americans: CDC

Exercise Rates Rising for Urban, Rural Americans: CDC
News Picture: Exercise Rates Rising for Urban, Rural Americans: CDCBy E.J. Mundell
HealthDay Reporter

Latest Exercise & Fitness News

THURSDAY, June 13, 2019 (HealthDay News) — The trend towards Americans getting off their couches and into gyms is hitting city and country folk alike, according to a new report.

Overall, the percentage of all adults who now meet or exceed federal exercise guidelines rose from 18.2% in 2008 to 24.3% by 2017, researchers at the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention said.

And the study finds that trend in both rural and urban areas. Among adults living in rural America, 13.3% were exercising in 2008 at recommended rates, but by 2017 that number had risen to 19.6%. And in cities, rates went even higher — from 19.4% to 25.3%.

Federal physical activity guidelines advise at least 150 minutes of moderate aerobic exercise per week, or 75 minutes of vigorous aerobic exercise, as well as at least a moderate-intensity muscle-strengthening workout two days per week.

The rise in exercise rates is heartening, the CDC team said, but of course more progress is needed, because “in 2017, only 1 in 4 urban residents and 1 in 5 rural residents met the combined [exercise] guidelines.”

The new study was based on 2008-2017 federal health data involving sample sizes of up to 37,000 adults surveyed nationwide each year. Researchers were led by Geoffrey Whitfield of the CDC’s National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion.

Two health care experts offered theories on why more Americans are getting more active.

It could be due to “increased stress with social, political and financial strains increasing over last few years,” suggested Dr. Theodore Strange, associate chair of medicine at Staten Island University Hospital in New York City.

“Additionally, more gyms have popped to meet that need as well as other group exercising facilities, like martial arts centers, CrossFit and spin classes,” he said. “Even employers are encouraging wellness and well-being by offering their employees opportunities to exercise daily and even offering financial/perk incentives.”

But another expert noted that not everyone is benefiting equally.

“In particular, Americans who live in rural areas exercise less than Americans that live in urban areas,” noted Dr. Teresa Amato. She directs emergency medicine at Northwell Health’s Long Island Jewish Forest Hills in New York City. She also noted that the study found lower exercise rates in the U.S. South versus other regions.

Amato agreed that sometimes workplaces can play a big role in boosting exercise rates. Large employers often sponsor “employee wellness and employee well-being initiatives,” she said.

“Many of these come in the form of forming exercise “teams” that have friendly competitions and awards for meeting certain exercise goals,” Amato added.

“Studies do conclude that individuals are more likely to begin and sustain exercise habits when they are done with an additional partner or ‘exercise buddy.’ In addition, exercise in a group may lead to longer exercise times and more mental well-being,” she said.

The study was published June 14 in the CDC journal Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report.

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SOURCES: Theodore Strange, M.D., associate chair, medicine,Staten Island University Hospital, New York City; Teresa Amato, M.D., chair, emergency medicine, Northwell Health’s Long Island Jewish Forest Hills, New York City; CDC’s Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report, June 14, 2019

Source: Medicinenet.com (Feeds API) – Daily Exercise

Surprising Ways Owning a Dog Is Good for Your Health

Surprising Ways Owning a Dog Is Good for Your Health
News Picture: Surprising Ways Owning a Dog Is Good for Your HealthBy Len Canter
HealthDay Reporter

Latest Exercise & Fitness News

WEDNESDAY, June 12, 2019 (HealthDay News) — Apart from the sheer fun of owning a pet, having a dog enhances well-being and even personal growth in many ways.

Caring for a dog teaches kids responsibility and offers everyone in the family unconditional love. Many studies have found that the social support that dogs — and pets in general — provide boosts their owner’s emotional health.

There are also many physical benefits to dog ownership.

Walking Rover on a regular basis — once or twice every day — can help you reach your own daily exercise goals and, in turn, lower your heart disease risk. In fact, according to one study, owners who walk their dogs on a regular basis are over 50% more likely to meet minimum exercise guidelines. Surprisingly, though, many people simply don’t walk their dogs enough for them or their pets to get in a good workout.

The advantages of having a dog extend beyond the home. Bringing your pooch to work can reduce your stress. And studies by researchers at Central Michigan University suggest the presence of a four-legged “co-worker” can boost cooperation, bonding and trust among employees. That’s important because getting people to work effectively as a group is often a challenge, even when companies try to engage staffers with activities like team-bonding exercises.

For the study, researchers divided participants into groups with and without a dog, and gave each group creative tasks to complete. People in the groups with a dog showed more enthusiasm and energy, and felt more closeness and trust than those without a dog. It seems that having a dog in the room encourages kind and helpful behavior, which in turn can help boost how well you do. If your workplace morale needs a jolt, consider a canine addition to the staff.

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Cyclobenzaprine vs. Zanaflex

Cyclobenzaprine vs. Zanaflex

Cyclobenzaprine vs. Zanaflex: What’s the difference?

What is cyclobenzaprine? What is Zanaflex?

Cyclobenzaprine is a muscle relaxant used with rest and physical therapy for short-term relief (up to two to three weeks) of muscle spasms associated with acute painful muscle and skeletal conditions. Cyclobenzaprine relieves muscle spasm when the spasm that results from local problems in the muscle itself and not from the nerves controlling the muscles. Cyclobenzaprine accomplishes its helpful effect through a complex mechanism within the nervous system, most likely in the brainstem.

Zanaflex (tizanidine) is a skeletal muscle relaxant used for the treatment and management of skeletal muscle spasticity, typically resulting from neurological problems. Spasticity may be due to multiple sclerosis or spinal cord injury. It works on alpha 2 receptors in the central nervous system (brain and spinal cord) and blocks nerve impulses from reaching muscles, which produces muscle relaxation.

What are the side effects of cyclobenzaprine and Zanaflex?

Cyclobenzaprine

The most common side effects of cyclobenzaprine include:

Other reported side effects include:

Possible serious side effects include:

Abrupt cessation after prolonged therapy may cause withdrawal symptoms such as headaches, nausea, and weakness.

Zanaflex

Common side effects of tizanidine include:

Latest Exercise & Fitness News

What is the dosage of cyclobenzaprine vs. Zanaflex?

Cyclobenzaprine

The recommended dose of cyclobenzaprine dose is 5 or 10 mg three times daily using immediate release tablets or 15 or 30 mg once daily using extended release tablets.

Zanaflex

Initially take 2 – 4 mg by mouth every 6 to 8 hours for up to 3 doses in 24 hours. Increase by 2 to 4 mg until satisfactory response is achieved; however, the maximum dose is 36 mg per day.

What drugs interact with cyclobenzaprine and Zanaflex?

Cyclobenzaprine

  • Cyclobenzaprine is chemically related to the tricyclic class of antidepressants, for example, amitriptyline (Elavil, Endep), nortriptyline Pamelor). As such, it should not be taken with or within two weeks of any monoamine oxidase (MAO) inhibitor, for example, isocarboxazid (Marplan), phenelzine (Nardil), tranylcypromine (Parnate), and procarbazine (Matulane). High fever, convulsions, and even death can occur when these drugs are used together.
  • Cyclobenzaprine interacts with other medications and drugs that slow the brain’s processes, such as

Zanaflex

Tizanidine should not be used with:

These medications can slow down the breakdown of tizanidine and lead to increased sedation, drowsiness and slowed reflexes.

Tizanidine should be used with caution with medications like:

These medications can further increase the side effects of tizanidine.

Are cyclobenzaprine and Zanaflex safe to use while pregnant or breastfeeding?

Cyclobenzaprine

There are no adequate studies of cyclobenzaprine in pregnant women. However, studies in animals suggest no important effects on the fetus. Cyclobenzaprine therefore can be used in pregnancy if the physician feels that it is necessary.

It is not known whether cyclobenzaprine is secreted in milk. However, since it is related to the tricyclic antidepressants, some of which are excreted in breast milk, caution is advised in using this medication in women who are breastfeeding.

Zanaflex

There are no adequate studies done on tizanidine to determine safe and effective use in pregnant women.

It is not known whether tizanidine enters human milk. Because it is soluble in lipids, it might pass into breast milk.

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Medically Reviewed on 6/6/2019

References

REFERENCE:

FDA Prescribing Information

Source: Medicinenet.com (Feeds API) – Daily Exercise

Cyclobenzaprine vs. Soma (carisoprodol)

Cyclobenzaprine vs. Soma (carisoprodol)

Cyclobenzaprine vs. Soma: What’s the difference?

What is cyclobenzaprine? What is Soma?

Cyclobenzaprine is a muscle relaxant used with rest and physical therapy for short-term relief of muscle spasms associated with acute painful muscle and skeletal conditions. It is only for short-term use, up to two or three weeks. Cyclobenzaprine relieves muscle spasm when the spasm is due to local problems, that is, in the muscle itself and not in the nerves controlling the muscles. Cyclobenzaprine seems to accomplish its beneficial effect through a complex mechanism within the nervous system, probably in the brainstem.

Soma (carisoprodol) is an oral muscle relaxant used together with rest and physical therapy for the short-term relief of acute painful muscle and skeletal conditions in adults. It is only used for 2 to 3 weeks. Its exact mechanism of action is unknown. It may work by altering communication among nerves in parts of the brain that control the sensation of pain and in the spinal cord.

What are the side effects of cyclobenzaprine and Soma?

Cyclobenzaprine

The most common side effects of cyclobenzaprine include:

Other reported side effects include:

Possible serious side effects include:

Abrupt cessation after prolonged therapy may cause withdrawal symptoms such as headaches, nausea, and weakness.

Soma

The most common side effects of carisoprodol are:

Serious side effects of carisoprodol include:

Carisoprodol is not a controlled substance. Patients may become dependent on carisoprodol, and discontinuation after long-term use may cause withdrawal symptoms.

Latest Exercise & Fitness News

What is the dosage of cyclobenzaprine vs. Soma?

Cyclobenzaprine

  • The recommended dose of cyclobenzaprine dose is 5 or 10 mg three times daily using immediate release tablets or 15 or 30 mg once daily using extended release tablets.

Soma

  • The recommended dose of carisoprodol is 250 or 350 mg three times daily and at bedtime.
  • The recommended treatment duration is 2 to 3 weeks.
  • To avoid withdrawal symptoms, carisoprodol should be stopped gradually if it has been used for a long duration.

What drugs interact with cyclobenzaprine and Soma?

Cyclobenzaprine

  • Cyclobenzaprine is chemically related to the tricyclic class of antidepressants, for example, amitriptyline (Elavil, Endep), nortriptyline Pamelor). As such, it should not be taken with or within two weeks of any monoamine oxidase (MAO) inhibitor, for example, isocarboxazid (Marplan), phenelzine (Nardil), tranylcypromine (Parnate), and procarbazine (Matulane). High fever, convulsions, and even death can occur when these drugs are used together.
  • Cyclobenzaprine interacts with other medications and drugs that slow the brain’s processes, such as

Soma

  • Carisoprodol interacts with other medications and drugs that slow the brain’s processes, such as alcohol, barbiturates, benzodiazepines (for example, lorazepam [Ativan]), and narcotics, accentuating their effects and causing drowsiness.
  • Omeprazole (Prilosec) and fluvoxamine (Luvox) may reduce the elimination of carisoprodol, leading to increased side effects.
  • St. John’s Wort and rifampin (Rifadin) increase the elimination of carisoprodol, possibly resulting in a reduced effect.

Are cyclobenzaprine and Soma safe to use while pregnant or breastfeeding?

Cyclobenzaprine

  • There are no adequate studies of cyclobenzaprine in pregnant women. However, studies in animals suggest no important effects on the fetus. Cyclobenzaprine therefore can be used in pregnancy if the physician feels that it is necessary.
  • It is not known whether cyclobenzaprine is secreted in milk. However, since it is related to the tricyclic antidepressants, some of which are excreted in breast milk, caution is advised in using this medication in women who are breastfeeding.

Soma

  • There are no adequate studies of carisoprodol in pregnant women.
  • Carisoprodol accumulates in breast milk in concentrations twice those of the mother’s blood. The effects of carisoprodol on the infants of lactating mothers are unknown. Therefore, caution should be used when using carisoprodol in women who are breastfeeding.

Subscribe to MedicineNet’s General Health Newsletter

By clicking Submit, I agree to the MedicineNet’s Terms & Conditions & Privacy Policy and understand that I may opt out of MedicineNet’s subscriptions at any time.

Medically Reviewed on 6/5/2019

References

REFERENCE:

FDA Prescribing Information

Source: Medicinenet.com (Feeds API) – Daily Exercise

Bike Lanes Do Help Keep Cyclists Safe

Bike Lanes Do Help Keep Cyclists Safe
News Picture: Bike Lanes Do Help Keep Cyclists Safe

Latest Exercise & Fitness News

FRIDAY, May 31, 2019 (HealthDay News) — Here’s a finding that should ease the minds of those who ride their bicycles to work: Bike lanes protect them as they pedal to their destination.

Researchers found they act as a calming mechanism on traffic, slowing cars and reducing deaths.

The researchers analyzed 13 years of data from 12 U.S. cities: Oklahoma City, Memphis, Kansas City, Mo., Dallas, Houston, Austin, Chicago, Denver, Seattle, San Francisco, Minneapolis, and Portland, Ore.

“Bicycling seems inherently dangerous on its own,” said study co-author Wesley Marshall, an assistant professor in the College of Engineering, Design and Computing at the University of Colorado Denver.

“So it would seem that a city with a lot of bicycling is more dangerous, but the opposite is true. Building safe facilities for cyclists turned out to be one of the biggest factors in road safety for everyone,” Marshall said in a university news release.

During the years included in the study, there was a 51% increase in the number of Americans bicycling to work, and the number of protected bike lanes have doubled each year since 2009.

At the start of the study, the researchers believed that with more bike lanes and cyclists, drivers would be more likely to slow down and be aware of cyclists, a “safety-in-numbers” effect, so to speak.

But they found that improvements in cycling safety aren’t due to a higher number of riders, but rather to protected bike lanes.

For example, Portland saw the biggest increase in bike lanes. Between 1990 and 2010, city’s bike lanes increased from 1% to 6%, while the road fatality rate dropped by 75%.

With more bike lanes, fatal crash rates dropped in Seattle (60.6%), San Francisco (49%), Denver (40%) and Chicago (38%), among others.

“When we believed it was the old safety-in-numbers concept, that meant we had to figure out how to get more people on bicycles to make a city safer,” explained study co-author Nicholas Ferenchak, an assistant professor in the department of civil, construction and environmental engineering at the University of New Mexico.

“That’s not easy. But this research has boiled it down for city planners: Create cycling facilities, and you’ll see the impact,” he said.

The study was published May 29 in the Journal of Transport & Health.

— Robert Preidt

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SOURCE: University of Colorado Denver, news release, May 29, 2019

Source: Medicinenet.com (Feeds API) – Daily Exercise