Variety is Key for the Fittest Americans

Variety is Key for the Fittest Americans

Latest Exercise & Fitness News

News Picture: Variety is Key for the Fittest Americans

MONDAY, Feb. 24, 2020 (HealthDay News) — Very fit American adults enjoy a wider range of physical activities than those who are less active, a new study finds.

The findings could help point to ways to boost physical activity in adults, according to the researchers.

Data gathered from more than 9,800 adults nationwide between 2003 and 2006 showed that those who were active had done at least two different activities in the past month, but the most active did five.

“Since a greater variety of activities was associated with meeting exercise guidelines, mixing up your workouts to vary the type of exercise could be beneficial,” said study lead author Susan Malone, an assistant professor of nursing at New York University, in New York City.

Walking was the most common activity, with more than 30% of adults averaging four 40-minute walks a week. Cycling and dancing were the next most common activities, the study found.

Forty-four percent of adults reported no physical activity. Those with chronic health problems and unhealthy lifestyle habits like smoking were more likely to be inactive, according to the study published recently in the journal Translational Behavioral Medicine.

But the researchers noted that some adults with chronic health problems do exercise regularly, suggesting that these patients can work physical activity into their lives.

“When encouraging their patients to exercise, clinicians should not just ask about frequency, but also what types of physical activities their patients do. They may even suggest engaging in a variety of activities,” Malone said in a news release.

“The ultimate goal is to develop targeted interventions to help people stick to their exercise plans and lower their disease risk,” she added.

National guidelines recommend adults get 150 minutes a week of moderate-intensity exercise, 75 minutes of vigorous exercise, or a combination of the two. But more than half of U.S. adults don’t achieve that.

The guidelines don’t account for the type or variety of activities.

“Developing a better understanding of patterns of physical activity, and the individual factors related to these patterns, could inform targeted interventions to increase physical activity,” Malone said.

— Robert Preidt

MedicalNews
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Pictures of the 7 Most Effective Exercises to Do at the Gym or Home (and Tips to Improve Form)
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References


SOURCE: New York University, news release, Jan. 29, 2020

Source: Medicinenet.com (Feeds API) – Daily Exercise

Exercise Surprise: Lifting Less Gets Better Results

Exercise Surprise: Lifting Less Gets Better Results

Latest Exercise & Fitness News

News Picture: Exercise Surprise: Lifting Less Gets Better Results

WEDNESDAY, Feb. 19, 2020 (HealthDay News) — Changing up the amount of weight they lift could help weightlifters get stronger with less effort, a new study suggests.

In traditional weight training — called one rep max — the maximum weight an athlete can lift dictates the weight load for all sessions.

This study compared one rep max with an approach called load velocity profile, in which athletes lift varying weights from session to session.

Over six weeks, athletes who used the load velocity profile became stronger than those who used one rep max, despite lifting less overall, according to sports scientists at the University of Lincoln, in the U.K.

The study, published recently in the Journal of Strength and Conditioning Research included 16 men, ages 18 to 29, with at least two years’ weight training experience.

The authors said their findings could help improve lifters’ muscle strength and power and make it easier to manage fatigue during training.

“There are a lot of factors which can contribute to an athlete’s performance on a particular day, such as how much sleep they have had, nutrition or motivational factors, but with traditional percentage-based methods we would have no insight into how this effects their strength,” said study leader Harry Dorrell, a lecturer in the School of Sport and Exercise Science.

The velocity-based training let researchers adjust athletes’ load up or down as needed, he said in a university news release.

“It’s about making sure the athlete is lifting the optimal load for them, on that particular day,” Dorrell explained. “If you lift too little then you won’t stimulate the body as you intend to; but if you lift too much you’ll be fatigued, which increases the risk of injury.”

— Robert Preidt

MedicalNews
Copyright © 2020 HealthDay. All rights reserved.




QUESTION


Walking can maintain your body weight and lower many health risks. True or false?
See Answer

References


SOURCE: University of Lincoln, news release

Source: Medicinenet.com (Feeds API) – Daily Exercise

Could High-Tempo Tunes Help Maximize Your Workout?

Could High-Tempo Tunes Help Maximize Your Workout?

Latest Exercise & Fitness News

News Picture: Could High-Tempo Tunes Help Maximize Your Workout?

WEDNESDAY, Feb. 12, 2020 (HealthDay News) — Gyms are bustling with regulars and resolutioners, all working up a sweat. But what’s the secret to an easy, effective workout? It may be in the music.

A new study found that listening to music at a higher tempo reduces the perceived effort of exercise. For endurance exercises, such as walking on a treadmill, the effects were greatest.

“We found that listening to high-tempo music while exercising resulted in the highest heart rate and lowest perceived exertion, compared with not listening to music,” said study author Luca Paolo Ardigo, from the University of Verona in Italy. “This means that the exercise seemed like less effort, but it was more beneficial in terms of enhancing physical fitness.”

The benefits of listening to music during a workout have been documented by previous studies. Music can serve as a distraction from the unpleasant parts of exercise. Understanding which properties and types of music are optimal for enhancing exercise could be the key to a better workout, Ardigo and his colleagues noted.

They analyzed the effect of the tempo of music on 19 women performing endurance exercises or high-intensity exercises, such as lifting weights. The volunteers exercised in silence or while listening to music at a range of tempos.

The effects were less pronounced in those performing the high-intensity exercises. These results suggest that those performing endurance exercises may get more out of listening to high-tempo music.

The findings were published Feb. 5 in the journal Frontiers in Psychology.

The researchers hope to study larger groups to explore how the nuances of music affect training.

“In the current study, we investigated the effect of music tempo in exercise, but in the future we would also like to study the effects of other music features such as genre, melody or lyrics, on endurance and high-intensity exercise,” Ardigo said in a journal news release.

— Kayla McKiski

MedicalNews
Copyright © 2020 HealthDay. All rights reserved.




QUESTION


Walking can maintain your body weight and lower many health risks. True or false?
See Answer

References


SOURCE: Frontiers in Psychology, news release, Feb. 2, 2020

Source: Medicinenet.com (Feeds API) – Daily Exercise

Health Tip: When to Stop Exercising Immediately

Health Tip: When to Stop Exercising Immediately

News Picture: Health Tip: When to Stop Exercising Immediately

(HealthDay News) — Training too hard or too fast is the culprit behind many exercise-related injuries, says BetterHealth. Before working out, consult with a doctor, gym instructor or coach on how to exercise safely.

BetterHealth mentions these warning signs that you should immediately stop exercising:

MedicalNews
Copyright © 2020 HealthDay. All rights reserved.




SLIDESHOW


Pictures of the 7 Most Effective Exercises to Do at the Gym or Home (and Tips to Improve Form)
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Source: Medicinenet.com (Feeds API) – Daily Exercise

Many Americans Are Inactive, With Southerners Faring Worse

Many Americans Are Inactive, With Southerners Faring Worse

Latest Exercise & Fitness News

News Picture: Many Americans Are Inactive, With Southerners Faring Worse

THURSDAY, Jan. 16, 2020 (HealthDay News) — Uncle Sam has a message for sluggish Americans: Get moving now.

More than 15% of American adults are physically inactive, a new U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention study reports. And all that time on the couch or staring into a computer screen adds to the risk of health problems and premature death.

“Too many adults are inactive, and they may not know how much it affects their health,” said Dr. Ruth Petersen, director of the CDC’s Division of Nutrition, Physical Activity and Obesity.

The CDC defined inactivity as doing no leisure-time physical activities in the past month — such as running, walking for exercise or gardening.

“Being physically active helps you sleep better, feel better and reduce your risk of obesity, heart disease, type 2 diabetes, and some cancers,” Petersen said in a CDC news release.

Her comments came as the agency unveiled new estimates of physical inactivity across states and U.S. territories.

Estimates ranged from 47.7% in Puerto Rico to 17.3% in Colorado.

Rates in seven states and two territories (Alabama, Arkansas, Kentucky, Louisiana, Mississippi, Oklahoma, Tennessee, Puerto Rico and Guam) were 30% or higher.

Southern states had the highest rate of inactivity (28%), followed by the Northeast (25.6%), Midwest (25%), and the West (20.5%).

The maps pointed to racial and ethnic differences in activity levels as well.

Hispanics had the highest rate of inactivity (31.7%), followed by blacks (30.3%) and whites (23.4%).

Rates were 30% or more among whites in five states and Puerto Rico; among Hispanics in 22 states and Puerto Rico, and among blacks in 23 states and the District of Columbia.

Inactivity contributes to 1 in 10 premature deaths in the United States and is associated with $117 billion in annual health care costs, according to the CDC.

The new maps are based on 2015-2018 data from an ongoing telephone survey conducted by the CDC and state health departments.

— Robert Preidt

MedicalNews
Copyright © 2020 HealthDay. All rights reserved.




QUESTION


Walking can maintain your body weight and lower many health risks. True or false?
See Answer

References


SOURCE: U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, news release, Jan. 16, 2020

Source: Medicinenet.com (Feeds API) – Daily Exercise