A Workout to Shape Your Shoulders

A Workout to Shape Your Shoulders
News Picture: A Workout to Shape Your ShouldersBy Len Canter
HealthDay Reporter

Latest Exercise & Fitness News

THURSDAY, Oct. 17, 2019 (HealthDay News) — Don’t shrug off working your delts, the muscles of your shoulders. Besides assisting with good posture, strong shoulders help you lift and carry items with ease, and create excellent upper body definition for men and women alike.

Deltoid rows work not only your shoulders, but also your biceps, lats and the muscles of your middle back. Begin in a standing position, knees slightly bent, with a dumbbell in each hand. Lean slightly forward from the hips, with a straight back. The weights should be just in front of your knees, with arms hanging down to the floor. Exhale and draw the weights straight up to your chest. Your torso stays still as elbows bend out to the sides — shoulders and upper arms should be in alignment at the top of the movement. Think of touching your shoulder blades as you hold for a second, then inhale and slowly return to the start position.

Now move to deltoid raises. Stand with feet shoulder width apart, a dumbbell in each hand at the front of the thighs. With control, exhale and raise the weights out in front of you to shoulder height, arms parallel to the floor. Inhale and lower the weights to the start position.

Finish with lateral raises. Start by holding the weights at your sides and, on the exhale, lift them out to shoulder level. Inhale as you return the weights to the start position.

For each exercise, do 10 to 15 reps for a complete set. Progress from one to three sets before increasing the weight. As with every strength training exercise, lift only as much weight as you can handle while maintaining proper form.

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Walking can maintain your body weight and lower many health risks. True or false?
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A Guide to Good Etiquette at the Gym

A Guide to Good Etiquette at the Gym
News Picture: A Guide to Good Etiquette at the GymBy Len Canter
HealthDay Reporter

Latest Exercise & Fitness News

WEDNESDAY, Oct. 16, 2019 (HealthDay News) — Universal gym etiquette includes steps like turning off your cellphone whenever you’re working out, being courteous when using shared equipment in the weight room, taking thoughtful steps such as not wearing heavy perfume, and wiping off your sweat after working out on a machine.

But there are also good rules to follow whenever you walk into an exercise class. Adhering to them can improve your performance as well as your standing at the health club and your all-important relationship with your fitness instructors.

First, use the minutes when you’re getting dressed for class to focus mentally. Get psyched for a serious workout and remind yourself that fitness boosts your motivation and enthusiasm.

Being on time benefits everyone. Lateness is more than distracting to your instructor and classmates. You miss out on the important warmup segment, warns the American Council on Exercise, and that puts you at greater risk for injury. If you’re late for a personal trainer session, it throws off the rest of your trainer’s schedule and means less time for you.

On the other hand, don’t be shy about asking questions that will help you improve and possibly avoid an injury. Don’t grin and bear it if a move hurts or if you’re unsure of how to do it. If you can’t get the attention of the teacher during class, bring up your concerns afterward — staying silent could just build resentment and get in the way of your progress. Your teachers want you to learn correctly and it’s their job to teach you in a way that will benefit you.

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Pictures of the 7 Most Effective Exercises to Do at the Gym or Home (and Tips to Improve Form)
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The Surprising Benefits of Weight Training

The Surprising Benefits of Weight Training
News Picture: The Surprising Benefits of Weight TrainingBy Len Canter
HealthDay Reporter

Latest Exercise & Fitness News

FRIDAY, Oct. 11, 2019 (HealthDay News) — The most common misconception about weight training is that it adds bulky muscle mass, a fear of some women. While elite male lifters can — and want to — get very developed, for most people the result is simply well-toned muscles.

Other benefits are increased mobility, more support for your joints and the ability to stay self-sufficient into your late years.

As an added bonus, having more muscle can also help you with your weight goal. That’s because the more muscle you have, the higher your metabolic rate and the more calories you burn. Add a calorie cut into the mix and you’ll lose weight.

Muscle is denser than fat and it also takes up less room. That’s why you can look leaner yet actually weigh more than someone without muscle definition.

To make the most of strength training, lift heavier weights than you think you’re able to. Yes, challenge yourself, staying within safe limits. You don’t want to try to lift a weight you can barely pick up off the weight rack, but most people underestimate the amount they can handle or fail to progress to heavier weights, according to the American Council on Exercise, and that limits the effectiveness of strength training.

Keep in mind, too, that you don’t have to spend hours in the gym. All you need are 20 to 30 minutes every other day to accomplish training goals. Do one to three short sets — eight reps per set — with high weights and a mix of exercises that target all the major muscle groups.

If you’re new to strength training, get your doctor’s OK first and work with a trainer on proper form.

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Walking can maintain your body weight and lower many health risks. True or false?
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Health Tip: Getting Too Much Exercise

Health Tip: Getting Too Much Exercise

(HealthDay News) — For many people, moderate-intensity exercise throughout the week is recommended, says MedlinePlus.

At the same time, neglecting rest can backfire.

MedlinePlus mentions possible symptoms of too much exercise:

  • Being unable to perform at the same level.
  • Needing longer periods of rest.
  • Feeling tired, depressed, anxious or irritable.
  • Having difficulty sleeping.
  • Having sore muscles.
  • Getting overuse injuries.
  • Getting more colds than usual.

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Pictures of the 7 Most Effective Exercises to Do at the Gym or Home (and Tips to Improve Form)
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Turf Toe Injuries Fell Multiple NFL Players, Athletes

Turf Toe Injuries Fell Multiple NFL Players, Athletes

By Adam Townsend on 10/04/2019 2:52 PM

Latest Exercise & Fitness News

Source: MedicineNet Health News

Greenbay Packer Davante Adams, a star wide receiver on the Wisconsin NFL team, likely won’t play against the Cowboys Sunday because of a condition called turf toe, or a strain to the ligaments of the big toe at the ball of the foot.

Adams joins the list of top athletes suffering from the obscure toe strain first recorded after the invention and widespread use of Astroturf and other artificial turfs.

As of the latest NFL updates, Adams’ status was still questionable and he wasn’t participating in practices.

Adams is just the latest and most high-profile turf toe sufferer in pro football. Atlanta Falcons defensive tackle Grady Jarrette may be out for the season because of turf toe, according to Atlanta’s 92.9FM sports radio station. A Boston sports station reports Patriots left tackle Isaiah Wynn’s doctors and coaches are deciding week by week whether to let him play because of his turf toe injury.

And though it’s more common among athletes playing on artificial grass, turf toe can affect anyone. CBSSports reported Wednesday the Chicago Bulls’ Luke Kornet missed a few practice days with turf toe, and could miss a pre-season basketball game or two because of the toe sprain.

What Is the Recovery Time for Turf Toe?

Minor turf toe injuries can usually heal up in a few days, but more severe ones can require surgery and may knock an athlete out of the game for life, according to , a MedicineNet author and athletic trainer.

“The amount of damage to the ligaments, tendons, bones, and surrounding tissues determines the severity of the injury,” Dr. Goo says. “Though often referred to as a ligamentous injury or sprain of the MTP joint, the tendons may be strained and bones may be fractured. American football players such as Tom Brady and Deion Sanders and soccer great George Best are among the notable athletes to have suffered from this sports injury.”

Turf toe is an injury to the underside of the big toe and joint at the base of the big toe. This joint, the first metatarsophalangeal (MTP) joint, is commonly known as the “ball of the foot.” Turf toe is specifically a joint sprain of the big toe. The sprain may involve damage to ligaments, tendons, or bone separately or in combination, Dr. Goo says.

The sprain, often a result of playing on artificial surfaces, was first documented in American football players in 1976. Turf toe was recognized as a common injury soon after the invention of AstroTurf in 1964. There are varying degrees of severity of the sports injury. While sometimes mild, which injured athletes can play through, turf toe is sometimes a more serious health condition and can be career-ending, Dr. Goo says.

What Is the Treatment for Turf Toe?

Acute management of turf toe injuries includes rest, ice, compression, and elevation (RICE). Immobilization will allow the affected tissues to begin to heal without stressing the joint. Ice will help to manage the discomfort and reduce swelling, while compression will aid in stopping bleeding under the skin surface and prevent fluid accumulation in the joint and surrounding areas. Elevation will drain and prevent fluid from accumulating in the joint, Dr. Goo says.

Over-the-counter (OTC) medications can help to manage pain and inflammation from the injury, he says. A physician may prescribe stronger medications for inflammation. Once the severity and cause of foot pain is determined, a course of corrective and rehabilitative actions can be started. Goals of treatment include pain management, increasing muscle strength and range of motion, maintaining cardiovascular conditioning, and re-establishing neuromuscular control.




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Pictures of the 7 Riskiest Workout Moves, and How to Improve Them
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