Do You Know Your Cardiorespiratory Fitness Level?

Do You Know Your Cardiorespiratory Fitness Level?
News Picture: Do You Know Your Cardiorespiratory Fitness Level?By Len Canter
HealthDay Reporter

Latest Exercise & Fitness News

FRIDAY, Aug. 16, 2019 (HealthDay News) — You might know your blood pressure and cholesterol numbers, but do you know your cardiorespiratory fitness level? Experts at the American Heart Association think this number may be an even better gauge of heart health.

Cardiorespiratory fitness shows how aerobically fit you are and how effectively your circulatory system sends oxygen throughout your body.

Research indicates that poor aerobic fitness is associated with a high risk of heart disease as well as death from various causes. It’s as dangerous as chronic illnesses and smoking. Yet cardiorespiratory fitness is the one risk factor not routinely checked at doctor visits — unless you request it.

Your doctor can measure cardiorespiratory fitness through what’s called your maximal oxygen consumption (VO2 max) or from readings taken while you do an aerobic workout. This reveals your body’s capacity for transporting and using oxygen during exercise. In between doctor visits, for a quick snapshot of your cardiorespiratory fitness profile, you can use an online calculator to test yourself. It’s not the same as having an actual test, but you’ll get a good idea of where you are for your age.

The good news about cardiorespiratory fitness is that you can improve it. How? By exercising on a regular and consistent basis. In healthy adults, high-intensity interval training (HIIT) more effectively raises cardiorespiratory fitness than moderate-intensity continuous training, even if you burn the same number of calories. Yes, you’ll huff and puff more during the periods of high-intensity exertion, but they alternate with rest intervals. And an HIIT workout typically takes less time to complete than a traditional cardio workout.

MedicalNews
Copyright © 2019 HealthDay. All rights reserved.




SLIDESHOW


Pictures of the 7 Most Effective Exercises to Do at the Gym or Home (and Tips to Improve Form)
See Slideshow

Source: Medicinenet.com (Feeds API) – Daily Exercise

The Return of a Training Classic for Runners

The Return of a Training Classic for Runners
News Picture: The Return of a Training Classic for RunnersBy Len Canter
HealthDay Reporter

Latest Exercise & Fitness News

WEDNESDAY, Aug. 14, 2019 (HealthDay News) — With running, proper form is essential for everything from desired speed to injury prevention. But for many people, muscle memory has locked in less-than-perfect form.

A very simple technique, popularized in the 19th century by chemist-turned-runner W.G. George and re-introduced a few years ago by reporter and author Christopher McDougall, offers a re-set. Known as the 100-Up, it involves two stages.

First you need to master the Minor — 30 knee raises, much like marching in place, done with perfect form.

Stand with shoulders over hips over ankles, feet about eight inches apart. Then bring your left knee forward and up to hip level as you press your left elbow back behind you. Return to start and repeat up to 30 times. Then repeat with the right knee. Be sure to land lightly on the ball of your foot, not the heel. It’s a rhythmic movement: Don’t lock joints or hunch forward for momentum.

Seems simple enough, but you may only be able to do 10 before your posture slips or you can’t raise your knee high enough. George described it as balancing on one leg while working the other. A current variation is to alternate legs and build up to 100 raises in total, 50 per side.

Once you can correctly do the 30 with each leg, repeat the exercise at a faster speed for the second stage, the Major.

Balance on the balls of your feet, heels just off the ground and your head and body tilted very slightly forward. Spring from the toes, bringing one knee to the level of the hip, then letting the foot fall back to its original position. Repeat with the other leg and continue raising and lowering the legs alternately. This action is exactly that of running except that you do it in place rather than moving forward. Again, build gradually until you can do 100 with perfect form.

For both the Minor and the Major, it’s fine to use your arms to help with force so that the upper body works in union with your legs.

MedicalNews
Copyright © 2019 HealthDay. All rights reserved.




SLIDESHOW


Pictures of the 7 Most Effective Exercises to Do at the Gym or Home (and Tips to Improve Form)
See Slideshow

Source: Medicinenet.com (Feeds API) – Daily Exercise

The Effects of Exercise on Your Appetite

The Effects of Exercise on Your Appetite
News Picture: The Effects of Exercise on Your AppetiteBy Len Canter
HealthDay Reporter

Latest Exercise & Fitness News

TUESDAY, Aug. 13, 2019 (HealthDay News) — Are you hungry after you exercise? That might not be a problem if you’re at a healthy weight, but if you’re trying to shed extra pounds, the calories you take in could replace the ones you just worked so hard to burn off.

For decades, researchers have tried to find out whether the intensity and/or duration of exercise could play a role in limiting hunger immediately and in the hours afterwards. Some, but not all, studies found that very high-intensity interval training (or HIIT) can cut your appetite. HIIT typically involves alternating 30 or 60 seconds of all-out effort with one to two minutes of rest, a pattern that you repeat for the 20 to 30 minutes of a workout.

Other research found that longer workouts, up to 90 minutes, are effective at dampening hunger. Another plus: A study review found that if you want to burn fat, the longer your exercise session, the more you’ll burn. Problem is, many people aren’t able to work such long workouts into most days.

Adding another wrinkle is that men and women seem to have different responses to exercise, making it impossible to suggest any one-routine-fits-all generalization. The answer? Try out different exercise timing and duration options to see which one has the best hunger-cutting effect on you. You might even find that exercise on an empty stomach first thing in the morning creates a different response than when you exercise after a full breakfast.

Hunger aside, remember that exercise alone won’t result in significant weight loss, but it’s excellent for building calorie-burning muscle and for overall health, so make sure it’s part of your overall wellness plan.

MedicalNews
Copyright © 2019 HealthDay. All rights reserved.




QUESTION


Walking can maintain your body weight and lower many health risks. True or false?
See Answer

Source: Medicinenet.com (Feeds API) – Daily Exercise

Personal Trainers' Top Tips

Personal Trainers' Top Tips
News Picture: Personal Trainers' Top TipsBy Len Canter
HealthDay Reporter

Latest Exercise & Fitness News

THURSDAY, Aug. 8, 2019 (HealthDay News) — Ever wonder what top trainers tell their best clients? Personal trainers excel in mapping out individualized exercise programs. And they also offer insights that can help fitness buffs stay motivated.

Here are some of their best tips:

  • Remember the cliche “Rome wasn’t built in a day” and take a long-term view of your goals. Just as you can’t lose 10 pounds overnight, it will take time to develop muscle and get you closer to the body you desire. It’s great to have an image of more defined pecs or glutes in your mind; just give yourself time to get there.
  • Don’t rush through your workouts. That leads to bad form, which is not only ineffective but a setup for injury.
  • If you’re not sure how to do an exercise, don’t waste time struggling — get one-on-one instruction. Working with a personal trainer, for even just a session or two, may be worth the fee. Think of it as an investment in your long-term health.
  • Recognize that on some days you may not be able to do your entire routine because of a time crunch or just because you’re tired. That doesn’t mean you have to forgo all exercise that day. Shorten your planned workout or find ways to get in 5 minutes here, 10 minutes there.
  • Use apps, online videos and tried-and-true DVDs to learn about new exercises and techniques to stay challenged. You might do them on your own at home or ask an instructor at your gym for specifics.
  • Dress the part. That means buying exercise wear that makes you look good and feel comfortable. You’re more likely to focus on your workout if you’re not worried about your clothes.

MedicalNews
Copyright © 2019 HealthDay. All rights reserved.




SLIDESHOW


Pictures of the 7 Most Effective Exercises to Do at the Gym or Home (and Tips to Improve Form)
See Slideshow

Source: Medicinenet.com (Feeds API) – Daily Exercise

Health Tip: Benefits of Yoga

Health Tip: Benefits of Yoga

(HealthDay News) — The ancient practice of yoga can provide a retreat from the chaos of life, says Harvard Medical School.

Yoga’s goal is to challenge yourself physically without feeling overwhelmed. The practice has been noted to provide both mental and physical benefits.

Latest Exercise & Fitness News

These benefits include:

If you have any health concerns about your ability to practice yoga, check with your doctor before starting a program.

MedicalNews
Copyright © 2019 HealthDay. All rights reserved.




QUESTION


Walking can maintain your body weight and lower many health risks. True or false?
See Answer

Source: Medicinenet.com (Feeds API) – Daily Exercise