How Long Does It Take to Recover from Laparoscopic Inguinal Hernia Surgery?

How Long Does It Take to Recover from Laparoscopic Inguinal Hernia Surgery?

How is laparoscopic inguinal hernia surgery done?

A laparoscopic inguinal hernia (rupture in the abdominal wall) repair is a routine surgery and may take up to two hours. A general surgeon usually performs the surgery in an operation theater. The patient is placed under general anesthesia during the procedure.

Preparation

  • Prior to the surgery the patient
  • Undergoes blood, urine and imaging tests.
  • Must avoid eating and drinking 8 hours prior to the procedure.
  • Must check with the doctor before taking any regular medications.
  • Must inform the doctor of any allergies, or if pregnant.

Procedure

  • An anesthesiologist administers anesthesia and monitors the patient’s vital functions during the procedure.
  • The surgeon makes three incisions in the skin below the navel, in the inguinal region.
  • The surgeon inflates the abdomen with carbon dioxide.
  • The surgeon inserts the laparoscope through one of the incisions and uses the other incisions for inserting the surgical tools.
  • Guided by the images from the laparoscope the surgeon gently pushes the protruding tissue or intestine back in place.
  • The surgeon checks for other weak spots as an inguinal hernia might occur on one side or both sides.
  • In case of incarcerated or strangulated hernia the surgeon may remove the hernial sac and repair the area with stitches.
  • The surgeon fixes a mesh in the weak area to prevent the hernia from recurring.
  • The surgeon strengthens the weak spot in the abdominal muscle wall with stitches if it is a direct hernia.
  • The surgeon closes the inguinal ring with sutures in case of an indirect hernia.
  • The incision is then closed with sutures.
  • The patient is brought out of anesthesia, administered pain medication, and monitored in the recovery room until vital functions are stable.

How long does it take to recover from a laparoscopic inguinal hernia surgery?

Most patients will go home the same day or a day after the laparoscopic inguinal hernia repair. Generally, people will be able to resume normal activities within two weeks, but will have to avoid heavy lifting and strenuous activities.

What are the risks and complications of a laparoscopic inguinal hernia surgery?

Laparoscopic inguinal hernia repair is one of the simplest and safest surgeries, but like any surgical procedure, carries certain risks.

Anesthetic side effects such as:

Surgical risks such as:

  • Infection
  • Pneumonia
  • Bleeding
  • Blood clots
  • Injury to nearby organs, blood vessels or nerves
  • Fluid (seroma) or blood (hematoma) in the scrotum, inguinal canal or stomach wall
  • Damage to the spermatic cord (the cord that carries sperm from the testicle to the penis), which may affect fertility
  • Pain in the spermatic cord or testicle
  • Bladder injury and/or difficulty in urination
  • Scar tissue (adhesions)
  • Incisional hernia
  • Injury to the testicle
  • Recurrence of inguinal hernia




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Medically Reviewed on 5/1/2020

References


Medscape Medical Reference

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What Is the Recovery Time for An Umbilical Hernia Surgery?

What Is the Recovery Time for An Umbilical Hernia Surgery?

Is umbilical hernia repair major surgery?


Umbilical hernia repair is a routine surgery; most people are back home afterward within 24 hours.

An umbilical hernia repair is a relatively routine surgery and takes about 20 to 30 minutes. It can be performed as an open surgery or a minimally invasive laparoscopic surgery. An open surgery might require two to three days of hospitalization, but with a laparoscopic surgery a patient may be able to go home the same day or within 24 hours.

How is an umbilical hernia surgery performed?

An umbilical hernia surgery is usually performed by a general surgeon. Depending on the condition of the patient, the surgeon might use one of the three types of anesthesia,

  • General
  • Local with sedation
  • Regional (spinal injection)

Preparation

Prior to the surgery the patient

  • Undergoes blood tests and imaging tests.
  • Must not eat or drink 8 hours prior to the procedure.
  • Must check with the doctor before taking any regular medications.
  • Must inform the doctor of any allergies.

Procedure

  • An anesthesiologist administers anesthesia and monitors the patient’s vital functions during the procedure
  • The surgeon makes one or more incisions in the skin next to the umbilical hernia.
  • The surgeon gently pushes back the protruding intestine and abdominal tissue back in place.
  • The surgeon may cut out dead tissue if it is a strangulated hernia.
  • The surgeon repairs the hole in the abdominal muscle wall with stitches.
  • The surgeon may also use a mesh for support.
  • The incision is then closed with sutures.
  • The patient will be monitored in the recovery room for a few hours.

Is umbilical hernia surgery painful?

An umbilical hernia surgery is not painful because the procedure is performed under anesthesia. During recovery there might be pain, which can be managed with painkillers.

What is the recovery time for an umbilical hernia surgery?

Most people can return to normal daily activities within a week or two after an umbilical hernia surgery. They may be advised to avoid heavy lifting or strenuous activities for about six weeks.

What are the risks and complications of an umbilical hernia surgery?

An umbilical hernia repair surgery is a relatively safe procedure, but carries a few risks, including:

  • Anesthetic side effects such as 
  • Wound infection
  • Pneumonia
  • Blood clots
  • Bleeding
  • Fluid collection under the skin (seroma)
  • Hematoma
  • Bowel injury
  • Paralysis of the intestinal muscles (paralytic ileus)
  • Reoccurrence of hernia, which is likelier in patients with the following conditions:
  • Postoperative infection




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Medically Reviewed on 4/15/2020

References


Medscape Medical Reference

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What Is an Umbilical Hernia Repair Surgery?

What Is an Umbilical Hernia Repair Surgery?

What is an umbilical hernia repair surgery?

When an organ protrudes through a weak point in the muscle wall or other surrounding tissue, it’s called a hernia. “Umbilical” refers to the navel region.

A hernia is a protrusion of an internal body part, such as the intestine, through a weak spot in the muscle or the surrounding tissue wall. An umbilical hernia repair is a corrective surgery for a hernia in the navel (umbilicus) region.

An umbilical hernia repair surgery is a procedure to return the herniated tissue back in place and strengthen the muscle wall with stitches and a mesh so the hernia doesn’t reoccur.

What is an umbilical hernia?

An umbilical hernia is an abdominal wall hernia, which occurs when a part of the abdominal membrane, fatty tissue or bowel protrudes through a weak spot in the muscle wall in or near the navel. Umbilical hernia may be

  • True or direct umbilical hernia, which is a symmetric protrusion through the umbilical ring, as seen in infants.
  • Indirect or paraumbilical hernia, which protrudes just above or below the umbilicus, common in adults.

What causes an umbilical hernia?

Infantile umbilical hernia

Umbilical hernias are common in infants, especially in premature babies. The umbilicus is a small opening in the abdominal muscle wall where the fetus is attached to the mother during pregnancy. This opening normally closes soon after birth.

Umbilical hernia occurs in children when the umbilicus doesn’t close fully and a part of tissue or bowel bulges through. It is often visible as a lump in infants when they laugh, cry or strain, and go back in when the belly is relaxed.

Adult umbilical hernia

Adult umbilical hernia may be caused by

  • Obesity
  • Ascites (fluid collection in the stomach
  • Large abdominal tumors
  • Multiple pregnancies
  • Previous abdominal surgery
  • Pressure on the belly from



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Should an umbilical hernia be repaired?

Infantile umbilical hernia

Generally, infantile umbilical hernia resolves on its own within one or two years and does not require surgery. Children may require a hernia repair surgery if: 

  • the umbilical hernia is larger than 2 cm.
  • the umbilical hernia persists beyond four or five years.
  • the child experiences pain or swelling in the umbilical hernia.

Adult umbilical hernia

In adults, small hernias without symptoms may be watched. Adult umbilical hernias do not resolve on their own and tend to grow larger. An elective umbilical hernia repair is often recommended in adults to prevent an emergency surgery.

An umbilical hernia repair surgery may be urgently required when there is

  • Pain in the hernia
  • Incarceration (the protruding tissue gets trapped and can’t retract)
  • Strangulation (blood supply to the hernia gets cut off leading to tissue death)
  • Hernia rupture
  • Skin ulcerations at the hernia site

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Medically Reviewed on 4/13/2020

References


Medscape Reference

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Sprains and Strains

Sprains and Strains

What causes a sprain or strain?

Sprains and strains occur when the body is put under physical stress. In these situations, muscles and joints are forced to perform movements for which they are not prepared or designed. An injury can occur from a single stressful incident, contact sports, or it may gradually arise after many repetitions of a motion. Usually, the mechanism of injury involves placing the muscle tendon unit or the ligament under excessive stretching, causing damage to the muscle, tendon, or ligament fibers.

Where do sprains and strains usually occur?

An ankle sprain is one of the most common injuries of a joint. Usually, the mechanism of injury is a rapid “rolling” or “twisting” of the ankle and turning it inward (inversion) so that the sole of the foot starts to point upward (supination). This causes stretching and damage to the ligaments on the outside or lateral part of the ankle that hold the joint stable. While common and many are mild sprains, some ankle sprains can be severe.

Knee sprains are common sports injuries and often make headlines because of their potential for ending professional athletes’ playing careers. There are four ligaments of the knee that allow it to act as a hinge joint, flexing (bending) or extending (straightening). The medial and lateral collateral ligaments and the anterior and posterior cruciate ligaments keep the knee in alignment and are assisted by the quadriceps and hamstring muscles. When a player completely tears the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) in the knee, it is described as a grade 3 injury of that cruciate ligament.

Neck injuries are common, for example, after a car accident. While whiplash is a nonmedical term, it accurately describes the head and neck movement when violently flexed forward and backward as the car abruptly stops. While the rest of the body is held in place with a seat belt and/or air bag, the head is like a bobble head and can continue moving. Both muscles and ligaments hold the neck bones (cervical vertebrae) in place, and the stresses placed on those structures can cause severe pain and damage. Sometimes, the vertebrae are not damaged, but the ligaments that support and stabilize the bones are torn, causing significant pain and swelling. On occasion, these injuries can cause the neck to become unstable and put the spinal cord at risk for injury.

Wrist injuries are common because we use our hands to perform many tasks. Usually, the wrist is damaged because of a fall, but repetitive tasks and a single aggressive move may also cause pain. Some sports are more prone to wrist injuries than others because of the forces that are placed on the joint. Sports injuries from throwing motions can occur in baseball, football, bowling, and tennis. Sports injuries from falling on an outstretched hand may happen with skateboarding, snowboarding, and skiing.

The thumb and fingers can also be injured. Skier’s or gamekeeper’s thumb is a sprain at the base of the thumb where the ulnar collateral ligament spans the metacarpophalageal joint, where the thumb attaches to the hand. This ligament holds the thumb stable during grasping and pinching motions. It is most often injured in a fall where the thumb is forced away from the palm of the hand, like when a skier falls and the ski pole pushes the thumb in an awkward direction.

Muscles strains may involve any body area that is required to perform work. Lower back pain and spasm is a common result of repetitive lifting injuries, but it only takes one twist or turn at the wrong time or in the wrong position to cause muscle fibers in the back to stretch and develop spasms. Low back strain is the most common work-related injury.

Muscles need to be well-balanced around the joints they move. For example, muscles can be damaged from overuse or imbalance. The quadriceps muscle in the front of the thigh extends the knee and is balanced by the hamstring muscles of the back of the thigh, which flex the knee. Excess bending or straightening can cause the muscle fibers to tear. Muscles that move and stabilize the hip are prone to injury. Groin injuries or groin pulls are strains of the hip muscles that normally move the thigh inward to the middle of the body. When the leg is pulled away from the body like doing the splits, the adductors are stretched and potentially damaged.

We use our arms and hands for a variety of activities, and the arm muscles (biceps and triceps muscles) and the forearm muscles may be strained by aggressive lifting, pushing, pulling grabbing, twisting, or any other activity that you can imagine the arm and hand trying to accomplish.

Chest wall muscles can be pulled or strained because of activities as aggressive as lifting or as seemingly harmless as sneezing or coughing. Acute strains of the large muscles on the outside of the chest (pectoralis muscles) or the muscles between the ribs (intercostal muscles) can cause severe pain and can mimic the pain of a broken rib.

The core muscles of the torso of the body, including the abdominal wall muscles and those of the back, lend stability to the trunk and are often the source of power for the arms and legs to lift and push. These muscles can be strained from many different activities that require the torso to bend, stretch, or twist.

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Pilates May Be Good Medicine for High Blood Pressure

Pilates May Be Good Medicine for High Blood Pressure

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News Picture: Pilates May Be Good Medicine for High Blood Pressure

MONDAY, April 6, 2020 (HealthDay News) — Pilates exercises can do more than help strengthen your abs — the moves may also lower high blood pressure and reduce artery stiffness, new research suggests.

Pilates is a workout program that focuses on core strength, flexibility, body posture and controlled breathing.

The new study included 28 obese women, aged 19 to 27, with high blood pressure (“hypertension“). The participants were non-smokers, had no chronic diseases, and did less than 90 minutes of regular exercise a week.

For the study, half of the women completed 12 weeks of mat Pilates sessions supervised by a certified instructor. The other 14 women made up a non-exercising control group.

The women in the Pilates group did three one-hour sessions a week, which included 10 minutes of warm up and stretch, 40 minutes of general mat Pilates exercises, and 10 minutes of cool down. The training intensity increased over the 12 weeks.

By the end of the training period, the Pilates group had significantly reduced arterial stiffness and blood pressure, including central (aortic) pressure, the investigators found. But the study did not prove that Pilates actually causes blood pressure to drop.

The study, published April 1 in the American Journal of Hypertension, is the first of its kind, according to study author Alexei Wong and his colleagues. Wong is assistant professor in the department of health and human performance at Marymount University, in Arlington, Va.

“We hypothesized that mat Pilates might decrease the risk of hypertension in young obese women. Our findings provide evidence that mat Pilates benefit cardiovascular health by decreasing blood pressure, arterial stiffness, and body fatness in young obese women with elevated blood pressure,” the researchers wrote.

“Because adherence to traditional exercise (both aerobic and resistance) is low in obese individuals, mat Pilates training might prove an effective exercise alternative for the prevention of hypertension and cardiovascular events in young obese adults,” the authors concluded.

High obesity rates among young adults are a major public health issue. Exercise is an important factor in preventing and managing heart health risks, but obese women tend not to stick with traditional workout routines, Wong’s team noted in a journal news release.

— Robert Preidt

MedicalNews
Copyright © 2020 HealthDay. All rights reserved.




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Salt and sodium are the same.
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References


SOURCE: American Journal of Hypertension, news release, April 1, 2020

Source: Medicinenet.com (Feeds API) – Daily Exercise