How to Stay Fit When You're Traveling for Work or Fun

How to Stay Fit When You're Traveling for Work or Fun

Latest Exercise & Fitness News

News Picture: How to Stay Fit When You're Traveling for Work or FunBy Len Canter
HealthDay Reporter

TUESDAY, Dec. 24, 2019 (HealthDay News) — If you travel a lot for business or pleasure, you may think that the most exercise possible is lugging your bags in and out of a car or through an airport. But it’s important to get in real exercise even when you’re away from home.

If you’re a business road-tripper, look for snippets of time to move those muscles, like when you stop for gas. Any bodyweight calisthenics will do. Think: squats. There are many varieties, but the basic is a powerhouse move. Stand with feet a little more than shoulder-width apart, arms out in front of you. Bend the knees and push your hips back, lowering your body until your thighs are below your knees if possible. And then return to standing position. Do three sets of 10. At your hotel, do planks or push-ups and some crunches.

If stuck in a car or on a plane for any length of time, try isometric exercises, where you can contract your muscles without needing to move around a lot. Put the palms of your hands together and press as hard as you can. That will engage your chest muscles. Contracting your gluteal muscles can help your lower back. Remember to hold each isometric exercise for 10 seconds. Do a few sets of 10 reps each.

Once you get to your destination, if you don’t have time to hit the hotel gym, take a walk around a park (or the convention center if you’re attending a conference) during lunch, or the hotel after your meetings. If you feel adventurous, there may be hiking trails nearby.

If you have a fitness tracker, use it to motivate you to sneak in some steps throughout the day. Whatever you do, keep exercise goals realistic while you are away, but remember you can always fit in some fitness wherever you are.

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QUESTION


Walking can maintain your body weight and lower many health risks. True or false?
See Answer

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Health Tip: Before You Run a Marathon

Health Tip: Before You Run a Marathon

Latest Exercise & Fitness News

(HealthDay News) — Before you accept the challenge of running a marathon, it’s important to make sure you and your body are prepared, says Rush University Medical Center.

The school provides eight marathon training tips for the prospective runner:

  • Get a checkup. Ask your doctor if your heart can handle the stress of a marathon.
  • Create a marathon training plan at least four months before the race.
  • Pace yourself. Figure out how far and fast you should run.
  • Find shoes that fit your feet, gait and body type.
  • Take a break. If you’re feeling achy or worn out, take the day off.
  • Make sure you drink extra fluids throughout your training.
  • Join a running group to stay motivated and learn practical advice.
  • Learn how to distinguish minor strains from serious injuries.

MedicalNews
Copyright © 2019 HealthDay. All rights reserved.




SLIDESHOW


Pictures of the 7 Most Effective Exercises to Do at the Gym or Home (and Tips to Improve Form)
See Slideshow

Source: Medicinenet.com (Feeds API) – Daily Exercise

Good Workouts Might Extend a Woman's Life

Good Workouts Might Extend a Woman's Life

Latest Exercise & Fitness News

News Picture: Good Workouts Might Extend a Woman's Life

SATURDAY, Dec. 7, 2019 (HealthDay News) — If you can tackle a tough workout, that may bode well for your longevity, new research suggests.

A woman’s risk of dying from heart disease, cancer or other causes is much lower if she can engage in vigorous exercise, scientists report.

The new study included more than 4,700 middle-aged and older women, average age 64, who were referred for treadmill exercise echocardiography because they had known or suspected coronary artery disease.

The women walked or ran on a treadmill with a gradual increase in intensity, and continued until they were exhausted.

During a median follow-up of 4.6 years, there were 345 heart-related deaths, 164 cancer deaths and 203 deaths from other causes. After adjusting for other factors, the researchers concluded that high exercise capacity was significantly associated with lower risk of death during follow-up, though the study didn’t prove a cause-and-effect link.

The annual rate of death from heart disease was nearly four times higher in women with poor exercise capacity (2.2%) than in those with good exercise capacity (0.6%), the investigators found.

The annual rate of cancer deaths was twice as high among women with poor exercise capacity (0.9%) than those with good exercise capacity (0.4%), and the annual rate of death from other causes was more than four times higher among those with poor exercise capacity (1.4%) than those with good exercise capacity (0.3%), the findings showed.

The study was to be presented Dec. 7 at a European Society of Cardiology meeting, in Vienna. Such research should be considered preliminary until published in a peer-reviewed journal.

“The results were the same for women over 60 and less than 60, although the group under 50 was small,” said study author Dr. Jesus Peteiro, from the University Hospital A Coruna in Spain.

“Exercise as much as you can. Fitness protects against death from any cause,” Peteiro advised in a society news release.

Heart imaging was conducted on the women while they were on the treadmill to assess heart function. Those with poor heart function during exercise were more likely to die from heart disease during follow-up. Heart function during exercise didn’t predict the risk of death from cancer or other causes.

“Looking at both examinations together, women whose heart works normally during exercise are unlikely to have a cardiovascular event,” Peteiro said. “But if their exercise capacity is poor, they are still at risk of death from cancer or other causes. The best situation is to have normal heart performance during exercise and good exercise capacity.”

— Robert Preidt

MedicalNews
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SLIDESHOW


Pictures of the 7 Most Effective Exercises to Do at the Gym or Home (and Tips to Improve Form)
See Slideshow

References


SOURCE: European Society of Cardiology, news release, Dec. 7, 2019

Source: Medicinenet.com (Feeds API) – Daily Exercise

Health Tip: Reducing Soreness in Muscles

Health Tip: Reducing Soreness in Muscles

See how to properly perform seven exercises including squats, lunges, crunches, and the bend-over row. Good technique is a must for effective and safe workouts.

Read more: Pictures of the 7 Most Effective Exercises to Do at the Gym or Home (and Tips to Improve Form)


Source: Medicinenet.com (Feeds API) – Daily Exercise

Health Tip: Creating a Healthy Routine

Health Tip: Creating a Healthy Routine

Latest Exercise & Fitness News

(HealthDay News) — People are creatures of habit, so breaking old practices and forming new routines can be daunting.

To start and maintain a new routine, NorthShore University Health System recommends:

  • Figure out what needs to be in your routine.
  • Set small goals.
  • Lay out a plan.
  • Be consistent over time.
  • Be prepared.
  • Make it fun.
  • Track your progress.
  • Reward yourself.

MedicalNews
Copyright © 2019 HealthDay. All rights reserved.




QUESTION


Walking can maintain your body weight and lower many health risks. True or false?
See Answer

Source: Medicinenet.com (Feeds API) – Daily Exercise