In the Future, Could Exercise's Benefits Come in a Pill?

In the Future, Could Exercise's Benefits Come in a Pill?

Latest Exercise & Fitness News

News Picture: In the Future, Could Exercise's Benefits Come in a Pill?

MONDAY, Jan. 13, 2020 (HealthDay News) — The benefits of exercise are well-known, but what if you’re not able to take a brisk walk or endure a punishing workout?

Luckily for you, scientists have identified a protein they think might one day help prevent muscle decline in seniors and people who are immobile.

Sestrin, the protein, accumulates naturally in muscle after exercise. The researchers decided to find out more about its link to exercise by conducting experiments in flies and mice.

They created a type of “fly treadmill” and trained the flies for three weeks. They then compared the running and flying ability of normal flies and flies bred to lack the ability to make Sestrin.

“Flies can usually run around four to six hours at this point and the normal flies’ abilities improved over that period. The flies without Sestrin did not improve with exercise,” said study author Jun Hee Lee.

Lee is a professor in the department of molecular & integrative physiology at the University of Michigan.

The researchers also found that triggering overexpression of Sestrin in the muscles of normal flies and maximizing their Sestrin levels gave those flies greater abilities than the trained flies, even without exercise.

Improved endurance is just one of the benefits of Sestrin. Experiments with mice showed that those without the protein did not gain the improved aerobic capacity, improved respiration and fat-burning typically associated with exercise.

“We propose that Sestrin can coordinate these biological activities by turning on or off different metabolic pathways,” Lee said in a university news release. “This kind of combined effect is important for producing exercise’s effects.”

Further investigation showed that Sestrin can also help prevent wasting of muscle that’s immobilized, such as when a limb is in a cast for a long time.

This “highlights that Sestrin alone is sufficient to produce many benefits of physical movement and exercise,” Lee said.

That suggests that Sestrin could help combat muscle-wasting due to aging and other causes without the need for exercise.

However, animal findings don’t always translate to humans and much more research is needed before that might be possible, according to the study authors.

For example, they still don’t know how exercise triggers Sestrin production.

— Robert Preidt

MedicalNews
Copyright © 2020 HealthDay. All rights reserved.




QUESTION


Walking can maintain your body weight and lower many health risks. True or false?
See Answer

References


SOURCE: University of Michigan, news release, Jan. 13, 2020

Source: Medicinenet.com (Feeds API) – Health News

Zika Damage Showing Up in Babies Deemed 'Normal' at Birth

Zika Damage Showing Up in Babies Deemed 'Normal' at Birth

News Picture: Zika Damage Showing Up in Babies Deemed 'Normal' at Birth

FRIDAY, Jan. 10, 2020 (HealthDay News) — Some infants who appear healthy at birth after being exposed to the Zika virus in the womb develop neurological problems during their first year of life, a new study finds.

The study included pregnant women in Colombia who were exposed to Zika and had fetal MRIs and ultrasounds as their pregnancies progressed.

Of the 82 babies delivered by the women, 77 were born with no sign of congenital Zika syndrome, a group of birth defects that includes severe brain abnormalities, eye problems and smaller-than-normal head size (microcephaly).

Seventy of the 77 infants underwent additional neurodevelopmental testing when they were 4 to 8 months or 9 to 18 months of age.

“These infants had no evidence of Zika deficits or microcephaly at birth. Neurodevelopmental deficits, including declines in mobility and social cognition, emerged in their first year of life even as their head circumference remained normal,” said study first author Dr. Sarah Mulkey. She’s a fetal/neonatal neurologist at Children’s National Hospital in Washington, D.C.

“About one-third of these newborns who underwent postnatal head ultrasound had nonspecific imaging results, which we believe are the first published results finding a link between subtle brain injuries and impaired neuromotor development in Zika-exposed children,” Mulkey said in a hospital news release.

The study was published online Jan. 6 in JAMA Pediatrics.

The findings highlight the importance of long-term neurodevelopmental follow-up for infants exposed to Zika in the womb, the researchers said.

“Normally, neurodevelopment in infants and toddlers continues for years, building a sturdy neural network that they later use to carry out complex neurologic and cognitive [thinking] functions as children enter school,” Mulkey said.

“Our findings underscore the recommendations by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention that all infants exposed to Zika in the womb undergo long-term follow-up, providing an opportunity to intervene earlier,” she concluded.

— Robert Preidt

MedicalNews
Copyright © 2020 HealthDay. All rights reserved.




SLIDESHOW


Conception: The Amazing Journey from Egg to Embryo
See Slideshow

References


SOURCE: Children’s National Hospital, news release, Jan. 6, 2020

Source: Medicinenet.com (Feeds API) – Health News

Flu Cases Surge Early, Could a Tough Season Lie Ahead?

Flu Cases Surge Early, Could a Tough Season Lie Ahead?

News Picture: Flu Cases Surge Early, Could a Tough Season Lie Ahead?By Dennis Thompson
HealthDay Reporter

THURSDAY, Jan. 9, 2020 (HealthDay News) — This year’s flu season has already turned bad quickly, and experts worry the worst is still to come.

Flu cases and flu-related hospitalizations have risen sharply since October, with at least 6.4 million reported cases and 55,000 hospitalizations, according to the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

At least 2,900 Americans have died from the flu, the CDC reported late last week.

“The season started in earnest earlier than it usually does. It crossed the threshold of an outbreak earlier,” said Dr. Anthony Fauci, director of the U.S. National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases.

“But the trajectory of the cases is really on a trajectory very similar to two of the worst years we’ve had on record,” the 2014-2015 and 2017-2018 seasons, Fauci continued. “Obviously, flu is forever unpredictable. It may turn around and peter out. But right now, the trajectory that it’s on looks like it’s going to be a really bad season.”

Comparing the trajectories, flu activity this year has surpassed the peak for 2014-2015, Fauci noted. And it’s climbing toward the peak for the 2017-2018 season, which wound up being the deadliest in nearly a half-century.

About 61,000 Americans died from flu during the 2017-2018 season, the CDC says.

However, it’s still too early to say whether this accelerated rise in cases will translate to a severe flu season overall, said Dr. Amesh Adalja, a senior scholar at the Johns Hopkins Center for Health Security, in Baltimore.

“It’s unclear when we’re going to hit that peak of the season. If that peak is reached earlier, I don’t think we will have as severe a season as was the case a couple of years ago,” Adalja said.

“But if we continue to see increasing numbers over the next couple of weeks, I do think we may have one of our more severe seasons. It’s still too early to say. It’s difficult to be in the prediction business when it comes to influenza,” he concluded.

The oddest part of the flu season is that the influenza B strain has proven to be dominant, with the more virulent influenza A strains of H1N1 and H3N2 playing only a supporting role, CDC data show.

Influenza B tends to hit children harder than adults because it is a more stable strain that undergoes less mutation between seasons, so adults tend to have better immunity from prior exposure, explained Dr. Robert Glatter, an emergency medicine physician at Lenox Hill Hospital in New York City.

“Children are at higher risk this flu season primarily due to a greater susceptibility to influenza B, the dominant strain we are seeing so far,” Glatter said.

There have been 27 pediatric flu deaths reported so far, according to the CDC.

Fauci said that it’s too soon to say whether this year’s flu vaccine is effective against the strains that are circulating.

Looking at the strains out there, it appears that the influenza B and H1N1 portions of the vaccine are well-matched, he said. However, the H3N2 part of the vaccine is not very well-matched.

“It isn’t a complete mismatch, but it isn’t a precise match,” Fauci said.

Nevertheless, the experts agree people still have time to get a flu shot.

According to Glatter, “The best way to protect yourself is to get a flu shot, and by washing your hands for at least 20 seconds with soap and water. While we don’t know if the flu season will get worse, it’s vital to get a flu shot if you haven’t had one yet.”

Fauci agreed.

“It’s not too late to get vaccinated at all,” he stressed. “The advantages of vaccination are very clear. It cannot only protect you against infection, but if you do get infected it might prevent you from getting a serious complication from the disease.”

MedicalNews
Copyright © 2020 HealthDay. All rights reserved.




QUESTION


Which illness is known as a viral upper respiratory tract infection?
See Answer

References


SOURCES: Anthony Fauci, M.D., director, U.S. National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases; Amesh Adalja, M.D., senior scholar, Johns Hopkins Center for Health Security, Baltimore; Robert Glatter, M.D., emergency medicine physician, Lenox Hill Hospital, New York City; U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention

Source: Medicinenet.com (Feeds API) – Health News

Health Tip: Preparing for a Wig During Cancer Treatment

Health Tip: Preparing for a Wig During Cancer Treatment
News Picture: Health Tip: Preparing for a Wig During Cancer Treatment

(HealthDay News) — If you’re coping with hair loss during cancer treatment, you may be considering a wig.

To prepare for a wig during cancer treatment, Breastcancer.org suggests:

  • Find pictures of your preferred color, length and style.
  • Cut your hair short.
  • Look online, at a wig shop or through a charity program.
  • Call your health insurance company. It may cover the cost of a wig.
  • If your treatment hasn’t started, consider searching for a wig ahead of time.

MedicalNews
Copyright © 2020 HealthDay. All rights reserved.




SLIDESHOW


Skin Cancer Symptoms, Types, Images
See Slideshow

Source: Medicinenet.com (Feeds API) – Health News

Many With Dog Allergies Might Only Be Allergic to Male Dogs

Many With Dog Allergies Might Only Be Allergic to Male Dogs

WEDNESDAY, Jan. 8, 2020 (HealthDay News) — Getting a female dog or neutering your male dog may help ease your dog allergies, an expert says.

“Up to 30% of people who are allergic to dogs are actually allergic to one specific protein that’s made in the prostate of a dog,” Dr. Lakiea Wright, an allergist at Brigham and Women’s Hospital in Boston, told CNN.

“If you’re allergic to only that specific protein in the male dog, you may be able to tolerate a female or a neutered dog,” Wright said.

A blood test for the allergen was approved last May by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration, CNN reported.MedicalNews
Copyright © 2019 HealthDay. All rights reserved.




QUESTION


Allergies can best be described as:
See Answer

Source: Medicinenet.com (Feeds API) – Health News